Tuff Schist

The adventures of an unstable geologist

Posts tagged space

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standupkid:

V’GER DEMANDS THE INFORMATION.
Thirty-five years after its launch, Voyager 1 appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere, according to a new study appearing online today.
The heliosphere is a region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles, and which is thought to be enclosed, bubble-like, in the surrounding interstellar medium of gas and dust that pervades the Milky Way galaxy.
On August 25, 2012, NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft measured drastic changes in radiation levels, more than 11 billion miles from the Sun. Anomalous cosmic rays, which are cosmic rays trapped in the outer heliosphere, all but vanished, dropping to less than 1 percent of previous amounts. At the same time, galactic cosmic rays – cosmic radiation from outside of the solar system – spiked to levels not seen since Voyager’s launch, with intensities as much as twice previous levels.
The findings have been accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

standupkid:

V’GER DEMANDS THE INFORMATION.

Thirty-five years after its launch, Voyager 1 appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere, according to a new study appearing online today.

The heliosphere is a region of space dominated by the Sun and its wind of energetic particles, and which is thought to be enclosed, bubble-like, in the surrounding interstellar medium of gas and dust that pervades the Milky Way galaxy.

On August 25, 2012, NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft measured drastic changes in radiation levels, more than 11 billion miles from the Sun. Anomalous cosmic rays, which are cosmic rays trapped in the outer heliosphere, all but vanished, dropping to less than 1 percent of previous amounts. At the same time, galactic cosmic rays – cosmic radiation from outside of the solar system – spiked to levels not seen since Voyager’s launch, with intensities as much as twice previous levels.

The findings have been accepted for publication in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

Filed under NASA voyager heliopause space science

4 notes

cariadnee:

Cool Geology of the Day:
The Soviet Luna 16 lunar lander.  The Luna program was a Soviet response to the American Apollo program to visit the Moon.  Luna 16 was designed to return a small sample of lunar soil to Earth.  It landed in Mare Fecunditatis in 1970.  The mission successfully returned 100grams of lunar soil to Earth, and the Soviet Union remains the only other nation to have directly sampled the Moon.

cariadnee:

Cool Geology of the Day:

The Soviet Luna 16 lunar lander.  The Luna program was a Soviet response to the American Apollo program to visit the Moon.  Luna 16 was designed to return a small sample of lunar soil to Earth.  It landed in Mare Fecunditatis in 1970.  The mission successfully returned 100grams of lunar soil to Earth, and the Soviet Union remains the only other nation to have directly sampled the Moon.

(via gneissgneissbaby)

Filed under moon space science

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kamalvalon:

cariadnee:

Cool Geology of the Day:
I love the HiRISE instrument.  It can see things as small as ~30cm on the Martian surface.  It can also look at other planetary objects. This is an image of the Earth and Moon…taken from Mars orbit. 
Science is awesome, guys.

So beautiful!

kamalvalon:

cariadnee:

Cool Geology of the Day:

I love the HiRISE instrument.  It can see things as small as ~30cm on the Martian surface.  It can also look at other planetary objects. This is an image of the Earth and Moon…taken from Mars orbit

Science is awesome, guys.

So beautiful!

Filed under mars space HiRISE NASA

302 notes

rhamphotheca:

A New Estimate for Neptune
Neptune’s thick, blue atmosphere obscures any solid landmarks, making the planet’s rotation tough to track. But after scrutinizing hundreds of images from the Voyager 2 spacecraft and the Hubble telescope, an astronomer says he’s done it: The ice giant rotates once every 15 hours, 57 minutes and 59 seconds. That’s eight and a half minutes faster than the previous best estimate. The new analysis depends on two stable cloud patterns that, during 20 years of observation, never blew away with prevailing winds. Their constancy suggests these disturbances are linked to stable features deeper inside the planet and reveal its underlying spin. The new day length could spur other discoveries. Neptune’s core density, for example, may be recalculated to account for the faster rotation.
(Image courtesy of NASA.)
- Karkoschka, E. Neptune’s rotational period suggested by the extraordinary stability of two features. Icarus (published online on American Scientist May 20)

rhamphotheca:

A New Estimate for Neptune

Neptune’s thick, blue atmosphere obscures any solid landmarks, making the planet’s rotation tough to track. But after scrutinizing hundreds of images from the Voyager 2 spacecraft and the Hubble telescope, an astronomer says he’s done it: The ice giant rotates once every 15 hours, 57 minutes and 59 seconds. That’s eight and a half minutes faster than the previous best estimate. The new analysis depends on two stable cloud patterns that, during 20 years of observation, never blew away with prevailing winds. Their constancy suggests these disturbances are linked to stable features deeper inside the planet and reveal its underlying spin. The new day length could spur other discoveries. Neptune’s core density, for example, may be recalculated to account for the faster rotation.

(Image courtesy of NASA.)

- Karkoschka, E. Neptune’s rotational period suggested by the extraordinary stability of two features. Icarus (published online on American Scientist May 20)

Filed under science planet space astronomy

56 notes

rhamphotheca:

Massive Meteorite Crater Found in Canadian Arctic
by Megan Gannon
Researchers in Canada’s western Arctic have found evidence of a crater that formed when a huge meteorite slammed into Earth millions of years ago.
Measuring about 15 mi (25 km) across, the formation was named the Prince Albert impact crater after the peninsula where it was discovered. Researchers don’t know exactly when it was created, but evidence suggests the crater is between 130 million and 350 million years old, according to a statement from the University of Saskatchewan.
Meteors are fragments of asteroids or comets that enter Earth’s atmosphere at high speeds; most are small, some as tiny as a grain of sand, so they discintegrate in the air, and only rarely are they large enough to make it to Earth’s surface. When meteors slam into Earth, they are called meteorites…
(read more: Live Science)       (image: Brian Pratt, Univ. of Sasdkatchewan)

rhamphotheca:

Massive Meteorite Crater Found in Canadian Arctic

by Megan Gannon

Researchers in Canada’s western Arctic have found evidence of a crater that formed when a huge meteorite slammed into Earth millions of years ago.

Measuring about 15 mi (25 km) across, the formation was named the Prince Albert impact crater after the peninsula where it was discovered. Researchers don’t know exactly when it was created, but evidence suggests the crater is between 130 million and 350 million years old, according to a statement from the University of Saskatchewan.

Meteors are fragments of asteroids or comets that enter Earth’s atmosphere at high speeds; most are small, some as tiny as a grain of sand, so they discintegrate in the air, and only rarely are they large enough to make it to Earth’s surface. When meteors slam into Earth, they are called meteorites

(read more: Live Science)       (image: Brian Pratt, Univ. of Sasdkatchewan)

Filed under geology arctic meteor space north america