Tuff Schist

The adventures of an unstable geologist

9 notes

entertainmentnerdly:

The water is always this blue in Peyto Lake, Banff National Park Canada. [OC] [4147x3110] via /r/EarthPorn http://ift.tt/YtaESW

Meltwater lakes gets their blue color from rock flour, extremely fine sediment that forms when rocks grind together beneath glaciers. The sediment is so fine, it remains suspended in the water column instead of settling to the lake bottom. The small particles scatter sunlight, while absorbing the shortest wavelengths (violet and indigo). The water, as usual, absorbs the longer wavelengths (orange, red, yellow). So the lake looks blue (or blueish green, which = turquoise).
(Thanks to Indiana Public Media for helping me explain coherently.)

entertainmentnerdly:

The water is always this blue in Peyto Lake, Banff National Park Canada. [OC] [4147x3110] via /r/EarthPorn http://ift.tt/YtaESW

Meltwater lakes gets their blue color from rock flour, extremely fine sediment that forms when rocks grind together beneath glaciers. The sediment is so fine, it remains suspended in the water column instead of settling to the lake bottom. The small particles scatter sunlight, while absorbing the shortest wavelengths (violet and indigo). The water, as usual, absorbs the longer wavelengths (orange, red, yellow). So the lake looks blue (or blueish green, which = turquoise).

(Thanks to Indiana Public Media for helping me explain coherently.)

2 notes

Jobs at the Zooniverse

dailyzooniverse:

Jobs at the Zooniverse

zoo2014-team
Look at this amazing group of people. How could you not want to work with them?!

Look at this amazing group of people. How could you not want to work with them?!

If you’re a web developer and would like to work with the largest and most successful citizen science group in the world, your chance is here. We’re a lovely group of people to work with and at the moment we have two job opportunities at the University of Oxford! View the jobs via the links below:

https://www.rec…

View On WordPress

19 notes

this-is-planet-earth:

Cave of the Hands

Cueva de las Manos, also known as Cave of the Hands is a series of caves in Argentina where ancient people painted on the walls over 9,000 years ago. These silhouettes are thought to be made by placing a hand on the wall and then blowing liquid pigment through a hollow bone to spray-paint the wall. Though not all are hand silhouettes, some are geometric designs, animals, hunters and weapons.

Pigments used include: iron oxides (reds), kaolin (white), natrojarosite (yellow), and manganese oxides (black).

The paintings in the caves are so significant that Cueva de las Manos, Patagonia is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

http://geology.com/

(via this-is-planet-earth-deactivate)