Tuff Schist

The adventures of an unstable geologist

6 notes

mangolava:

Malachite
(I own this sample!)

Look! An item for scale! Such considerations are as important for photographs of crystals and hand samples as they are for photographs of road cuts and mountains.

10 notes

detectivelys:

Aeolian loess drift, Alaska.
Loess
* when Glaciers run across land they drag lots of underground material with them, such as rocks and soil
* over time they erode that material into smaller, finer pieces, even finer than sand: silt. 
* parts of the glaciers melt: through the glacier mouth ‘milky’ melt water flows out with the suspended load 
* once the glacier oscillates the aera becomes a periglacial zone
* due to extrem coldness no vegetation is around and the dryness prevents the silt particals from sticking together
-> through aeolian deflation the silt travels and is then called Loess.
* Properties: makes the ground really fertile, is very susceptible to hyrdo-erosion

Photo: NASA / Jeff Schmaltz / MODIS / Goddard Space Flight Center 

detectivelys:

Aeolian loess drift, Alaska.

Loess

* when Glaciers run across land they drag lots of underground material with them, such as rocks and soil

* over time they erode that material into smaller, finer pieces, even finer than sand: silt. 

* parts of the glaciers melt: through the glacier mouth ‘milky’ melt water flows out with the suspended load 

* once the glacier oscillates the aera becomes a periglacial zone

* due to extrem coldness no vegetation is around and the dryness prevents the silt particals from sticking together

-> through aeolian deflation the silt travels and is then called Loess.

* Properties: makes the ground really fertile, is very susceptible to hyrdo-erosion

Photo: NASA / Jeff Schmaltz / MODIS / Goddard Space Flight Center 

5 notes

domicilioconocido:

Wadi landscape: the temporal flow of water in these valleys shape the rock and allow wildlife and agriculture to settle for some time. When properly managed, wadis provide water for nearby cities aswell.  #geology #wonder #wadi #landscape #river #desert #muscat #oman #buraimi #nature  More at: www.domicilioconocido.tumblr.com

domicilioconocido:

Wadi landscape: the temporal flow of water in these valleys shape the rock and allow wildlife and agriculture to settle for some time. When properly managed, wadis provide water for nearby cities aswell.
#geology #wonder #wadi #landscape #river #desert #muscat #oman #buraimi #nature
More at: www.domicilioconocido.tumblr.com

182 notes

libutron:

Undulatus Asperatus Clouds 
This amazing shot shows a group of Undulatus Asperatus clouds in the sky of Ohio, United States.
While they haven’t been formally recognized yet by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), undulatus asperatus clouds, whose name literally means “agitated waves,” are strikingly visual reminders that the atmosphere is an ocean of gas, complete with cloud waves crashing high above. They occur when enough atmospheric instability, or rising air, is available to create widespread cloud cover, as well as wind shear and turbulence, which creates the wavy, rough sea-like visual effect.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©@Ti_Cranium | Locality: Bergholz, Ohio, United States (2011)

libutron:

Undulatus Asperatus Clouds 

This amazing shot shows a group of Undulatus Asperatus clouds in the sky of Ohio, United States.

While they haven’t been formally recognized yet by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), undulatus asperatus clouds, whose name literally means “agitated waves,” are strikingly visual reminders that the atmosphere is an ocean of gas, complete with cloud waves crashing high above. They occur when enough atmospheric instability, or rising air, is available to create widespread cloud cover, as well as wind shear and turbulence, which creates the wavy, rough sea-like visual effect.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©@Ti_Cranium | Locality: Bergholz, Ohio, United States (2011)

(via circuitdesign)

129 notes

earthstory:

Whopping nephrite boulderNephrite is one of the two unrelated minerals that occupy the umbrella term jade, and it occurs in many locations, being a mineral formed by high pressure metamorphism. Micro crystals aggregate together to produce something that looks like a rock, while remaining monomineralic. Colour varies from white to black, with the more common variety being a spinach green colour with black crystalline inclusions. Major commercial sources include China, Australia (black) and the British Columbia region in Canada, where this huge 18 ton boulder was discovered. If you want to fondle a large(ish) boulder for yourself, hidden in the back of an alcove of the main entrance hall in London’s Natural History Museum there is a lovely piece of river shaped deep green nephrite from New Zealand you can go an run your hands over. LozImage credit: Jade West

earthstory:

Whopping nephrite boulder

Nephrite is one of the two unrelated minerals that occupy the umbrella term jade, and it occurs in many locations, being a mineral formed by high pressure metamorphism. Micro crystals aggregate together to produce something that looks like a rock, while remaining monomineralic. Colour varies from white to black, with the more common variety being a spinach green colour with black crystalline inclusions. Major commercial sources include China, Australia (black) and the British Columbia region in Canada, where this huge 18 ton boulder was discovered. If you want to fondle a large(ish) boulder for yourself, hidden in the back of an alcove of the main entrance hall in London’s Natural History Museum there is a lovely piece of river shaped deep green nephrite from New Zealand you can go an run your hands over. 

Loz

Image credit: Jade West

(via euhedral-tectosilicate)

688 notes

spaceplasma:

Mars Orbiters ‘Duck and Cover’ for Comet Siding Spring Encounter

NASA is taking steps to protect its Mars orbiters, while preserving opportunities to gather valuable scientific data, as Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring heads toward a close flyby of Mars on Oct. 19.

The comet’s nucleus will miss Mars by about 82,000 miles (132,000 kilometers), shedding material hurtling at about 35 miles (56 kilometers) per second, relative to Mars and Mars-orbiting spacecraft. At that velocity, even the smallest particle — estimated to be about one-fiftieth of an inch (half a millimeter) across — could cause significant damage to a spacecraft.

NASA currently operates two Mars orbiters, with a third on its way and expected to arrive in Martian orbit just a month before the comet flyby. Teams operating the orbiters plan to have all spacecraft positioned on the opposite side of the Red Planet when the comet is most likely to pass by.

The European Space Agency is taking similar precautions to protect its Mars Express (MEX) orbiter.
  • For more information about the Mars flyby of comet Siding Spring, click here.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

(via gneissgneissbaby)