Tuff Schist

The adventures of an unstable geologist

9 notes

wouldirunoff:

Someone from the department just emailed me this. Bowen was a really important geologist, for some context. (link to more in depth explanation of why Bowen was important)
This is so beautiful. 
these guys were pals, so this is all kidding around or whatever, but it’s still beautiful
Excerpt from the link above: “Some readers may also recall the delightful discussion on the origin of granites in which Bowen described the metasomatizers as the “soaks” who had to have their liquor in lavish quantities whereas the pontiffs, the magmatists, handled their liquor like gentlemen, taking it or leaving it as the occasion indicates.”

wouldirunoff:

Someone from the department just emailed me this. Bowen was a really important geologist, for some context. (link to more in depth explanation of why Bowen was important)

This is so beautiful. 

these guys were pals, so this is all kidding around or whatever, but it’s still beautiful

Excerpt from the link above: “Some readers may also recall the delightful discussion on the origin of granites in which Bowen described the metasomatizers as the “soaks” who had to have their liquor in lavish quantities whereas the pontiffs, the magmatists, handled their liquor like gentlemen, taking it or leaving it as the occasion indicates.”

55 notes

earthstory:

This is Salar de Uyuni, a salt flat measuring 10,582 sq km located in Bolivia’s southwestern regions of Oruno and Potosi. Around 400,000 years ago this location was part of the great Lake Minchin, which has since dried out leaving behind two lakes, Poopo and Uru Uru, and two salt flats, this being the largest. When it rains, the flat surface becomes covered with a shallow pool of water, this acts as a gigantic mirror reflecting the sky, and everything else effortlessly! Cool eh? But wait, there’s more!The area is so reflective it is utilised as a calibration tool for satellites, or more specifically; remote sensing instruments. It is considered to be 5 times better for calibration than the surface of the oceans. Impressive!-JeanFor more photos and information on the salt flats see here:http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/08/salar-de-uyuni-spectacular-sea-of-salt.htmlPhoto courtesy of: Diego Salgado Mohor

earthstory:

This is Salar de Uyuni, a salt flat measuring 10,582 sq km located in Bolivia’s southwestern regions of Oruno and Potosi. Around 400,000 years ago this location was part of the great Lake Minchin, which has since dried out leaving behind two lakes, Poopo and Uru Uru, and two salt flats, this being the largest. 

When it rains, the flat surface becomes covered with a shallow pool of water, this acts as a gigantic mirror reflecting the sky, and everything else effortlessly! 

Cool eh? But wait, there’s more!

The area is so reflective it is utilised as a calibration tool for satellites, or more specifically; remote sensing instruments. It is considered to be 5 times better for calibration than the surface of the oceans. Impressive!

-Jean

For more photos and information on the salt flats see here:http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/08/salar-de-uyuni-spectacular-sea-of-salt.html

Photo courtesy of: Diego Salgado Mohor

6 notes

New Detailed Mars Map Issued

hannahgoestomars:

For anyone interested in the geology (or, should I say, areology!) of Mars, this fantastic new map has been released, detailing the different properties of the regions of the planet’s surface. 

15 notes

wonderousscience:

In one of the biggest-ever seismology deployments at an active volcano, researchers are peppering Mount St Helens in Washington state with equipment to study the intricate system of chambers and pipes that fed the most devastating eruption in US history. This month, they will even set off explosions to generate their own seismic waves. The work could inform research into how volcanoes work throughout the Pacific Northwest and in similar geological settings around the world.
Researchers have already explored magma structures beneath volcanoes such as Italy’s Etna and Vesuvius, and an ongoing multidisciplinary project in the Andes targets two volcanoes in Bolivia and Chile where the ground has been rising for about two decades. But the Mount St Helens study is unique because it aims to produce a three-dimensional picture all the way through and beneath the volcano. If all goes well, it may probe as much as 80 kilo­metres underground — deep enough for scientists to visualize the mountain’s geological origins.
Click here to read the full article

wonderousscience:

In one of the biggest-ever seismology deployments at an active volcano, researchers are peppering Mount St Helens in Washington state with equipment to study the intricate system of chambers and pipes that fed the most devastating eruption in US history. This month, they will even set off explosions to generate their own seismic waves. The work could inform research into how volcanoes work throughout the Pacific Northwest and in similar geological settings around the world.

Researchers have already explored magma structures beneath volcanoes such as Italy’s Etna and Vesuvius, and an ongoing multidisciplinary project in the Andes targets two volcanoes in Bolivia and Chile where the ground has been rising for about two decades. But the Mount St Helens study is unique because it aims to produce a three-dimensional picture all the way through and beneath the volcano. If all goes well, it may probe as much as 80 kilo­metres underground — deep enough for scientists to visualize the mountain’s geological origins.

Click here to read the full article

152 notes

mypubliclands:

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, Montana — Bob Wick, Instagram Guest Photographer 
About the photo: This photo is an example of the use of use of framing to add a sense of intrigue to the image by blocking part of the view – Viewers will look at the person in the “Hole in the Rock” and wonder what that individual is seeing.  To access the Hole in the Rock and other amazing photogenic rock formations, one must take a multi-day float trip down the Upper Missouri Wild and Scenic River. You will be following the same route (albeit going downstream) that Lewis and Clark came up on their voyage of discovery.  The Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument hold a spectacular array of plant life, wildlife, unique geological features, endless recreational opportunities and significant historical and cultural values. The 149-mile Upper Missouri National Wild and Scenic River flows through the monument. The land and the rugged, surrounding uplands (commonly call the Missouri Breaks) are defined in part by their history. Learn about float trip and other opportunities at the Missouri Breaks Interpretive Center at 701 7th Street, Fort Benton, Montana.
Camera Settings: Lens focal length: 30mm, aperture: f14, shutter speed: 1/30 second, ISO 100

mypubliclands:

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument, Montana — Bob Wick, Instagram Guest Photographer 

About the photo: This photo is an example of the use of use of framing to add a sense of intrigue to the image by blocking part of the view – Viewers will look at the person in the “Hole in the Rock” and wonder what that individual is seeing.  To access the Hole in the Rock and other amazing photogenic rock formations, one must take a multi-day float trip down the Upper Missouri Wild and Scenic River. You will be following the same route (albeit going downstream) that Lewis and Clark came up on their voyage of discovery.  The Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument hold a spectacular array of plant life, wildlife, unique geological features, endless recreational opportunities and significant historical and cultural values. The 149-mile Upper Missouri National Wild and Scenic River flows through the monument. The land and the rugged, surrounding uplands (commonly call the Missouri Breaks) are defined in part by their history. Learn about float trip and other opportunities at the Missouri Breaks Interpretive Center at 701 7th Street, Fort Benton, Montana.

Camera Settings: Lens focal length: 30mm, aperture: f14, shutter speed: 1/30 second, ISO 100

(via juniorranger)