Tuff Schist

The adventures of an unstable geologist

16 notes

earthstory:

Aniakchak
This is one part of the rim of the caldera of Aniakchak, a 3700 year old volcanic caldera in the Aleutian islands of Alaska. The caldera formed after a large eruption emptied the magma chamber beneath, allowing the mountain to collapse downward into the empty space. The caldera is about 10 kilometers across and a kilometer deep, and as shown by the newly-grown volcanic peak inside the caldera, the mountain has been active since the major eruption.
Aniakchak volcano is part of the remote Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, one of the most remote locations in the entire U.S. National Park Service.
-JBB
Image credit: NPShttp://www.nps.gov/ania/photosmultimedia/index.htmhttps://www.avo.alaska.edu/volcanoes/volcinfo.php?volcname=Aniakchak

earthstory:

Aniakchak

This is one part of the rim of the caldera of Aniakchak, a 3700 year old volcanic caldera in the Aleutian islands of Alaska. The caldera formed after a large eruption emptied the magma chamber beneath, allowing the mountain to collapse downward into the empty space. The caldera is about 10 kilometers across and a kilometer deep, and as shown by the newly-grown volcanic peak inside the caldera, the mountain has been active since the major eruption.

Aniakchak volcano is part of the remote Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, one of the most remote locations in the entire U.S. National Park Service.

-JBB

Image credit: NPS
http://www.nps.gov/ania/photosmultimedia/index.htm
https://www.avo.alaska.edu/volcanoes/volcinfo.php?volcname=Aniakchak

3,296 notes

awkwardsituationist:

dionys moser photographs the alien like landscape of the ethiopian dallol hydrothermal field, a vast area of uplifted thick salt deposits affected by intense fumarolic activity, famous for being the only known volcanic area bellow sea level and for being both the hottest place on the planet, with average annual temperatures well above 30 degrees celsius, and the most colourful, with its pools of a hot sulfuric acid brine and ferrous multicolored salt deposits.

(via gneissgneissbaby)

9 notes

waterwhatever:

"The ash plume from the eruption of the Kliuchevskoi Volcano in the Kamchatka peninsula, seen from the Space Shuttle Endeavour in October, 1994"

waterwhatever:

"The ash plume from the eruption of the Kliuchevskoi Volcano in the Kamchatka peninsula, seen from the Space Shuttle Endeavour in October, 1994"

145 notes

bunnybundy:

April 12, 1981 - after a two day launch delay, the world’s first Space Shuttle, Columbia, launches from the Cape. STS-1’s crew, John Young and Bob Crippen, become the ultimate test pilots, flying NASA’s first manned maiden flight of any spacecraft. Unaware of a potentially catastrophic fire in the front wheel well, Young lands Columbia perfectly on April 14, after 37 orbits of the Earth. He becomes the only human being to fly the Gemini, Apollo and Shuttle crafts, and to have walked on the moon.

(via circuitdesign)

6 notes

earth-coordinates:

Say hello to the extinct Exogyra texana! These little guys lived during the Cretaceous and helped form reef complexes. Most are found in central Texas and I found my specimens in a road cut in Llano.

earth-coordinates:

Say hello to the extinct Exogyra texana! These little guys lived during the Cretaceous and helped form reef complexes. Most are found in central Texas and I found my specimens in a road cut in Llano.

232 notes

distant-traveller:

Io in true color

The strangest moon in the Solar System is bright yellow. This picture, an attempt to show how Io would appear in the “true colors” perceptible to the average human eye, was taken in 1999 July by the Galileo spacecraft that orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003. Io’s colors derive from sulfur and molten silicate rock. The unusual surface of Io is kept very young by its system of active volcanoes. The intense tidal gravity of Jupiter stretches Io and damps wobbles caused by Jupiter’s other Galilean moons. The resulting friction greatly heats Io’s interior, causing molten rock to explode through the surface. Io’s volcanoes are so active that they are effectively turning the whole moon inside out. Some of Io’s volcanic lava is so hot it glows in the dark.

Image credit: Galileo Project, JPL, NASA

distant-traveller:

Io in true color

The strangest moon in the Solar System is bright yellow. This picture, an attempt to show how Io would appear in the “true colors” perceptible to the average human eye, was taken in 1999 July by the Galileo spacecraft that orbited Jupiter from 1995 to 2003. Io’s colors derive from sulfur and molten silicate rock. The unusual surface of Io is kept very young by its system of active volcanoes. The intense tidal gravity of Jupiter stretches Io and damps wobbles caused by Jupiter’s other Galilean moons. The resulting friction greatly heats Io’s interior, causing molten rock to explode through the surface. Io’s volcanoes are so active that they are effectively turning the whole moon inside out. Some of Io’s volcanic lava is so hot it glows in the dark.

Image credit: Galileo Project, JPL, NASA

(Source: apod.nasa.gov, via circuitdesign)